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NOTHING TO SNIFF AT Bizarre deodorant ‘makes women SMELL younger’ thanks to genius scientific trick By Charlotte Edwards, Digital Technology and Science Reporter 4 Jun 2019, 17:26 Updated: 4 Jun 2019, 17:27 story originally published at www.thesun.co.uk AN ANTI-AGEING deodorant...
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(NaturalNews) It's no secret that common deodorants, while they smell fragrant and have pleasant-sounding names that make people feel as though they are rugged warriors or living in the tropics, are filled with body-damaging chemicals. Namely, aluminum compounds, parabens and phthalates are ingredients in many kinds of antiperspirants and deodorants designed to act as preservatives while also fending off offensive odors. (1)

These chemicals, however, are linked to having unsettling health consequences ranging from increasing the risk of Alzheimer's disease and breast cancers to leading to immune toxicity and irritation
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(NaturalNews) As the temperature rises in the body, thousands of sweat glands begin to bead up, preparing to cool the body down. The average person possesses about 2.6 millions sweat glands -- a built in thermostat. This system is made up of eccrine glands and apocrine glands.

Eccrine glands are the most numerous, harbored in places like the forehead, hands, and feet. These glands are activated at birth and do not secrete proteins or fatty acids.
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It’s a well-known fact that even the smallest amount of aluminum, if found in a person’s brain tissue, can become a huge problem. There have also been many studies that look into how having high-levels of aluminum in brain tissue is correlated with neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Now a new study puts the spotlight on autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and tests to see if there might be a connection between it and having high-levels of aluminum in the brain.
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Clinical studies dating back decades report a disproportionately high number of female breast cancers originating in the upper outer quadrant of the breast [1], and although this is attributed to a greater amount of epithelial tissue in that region, it is also the area to which underarm cosmetic products are applied [2, 3]. Early studies reported 31% of cancers in the upper outer quadrant [1], but later studies in the 1990s report up to 61% [2, 3]. The annually recorded quadrant incidence of breast cancer in Britain documents a rise in England and Wales from 47.9% in the upper outer quadrant in 1979 to 53.3% in 2000, and in Scotland a rise from 38.3% in the upper outer quadrant in 1980 to 54.7% in 2001 [4]. Any increase in the disproportionality of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant would be inconsistent with an explanation relating to the greater amount of target epithelial tissue in that region but does parallel the increasing use of cosmetics in the underarm area [2, 3, 4, 5].
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