DEODORANT CHALLENGE: THE SOCIAL MEDIA CRAZE THAT’S BURNING CHILDREN’S SKIN

DEODORANT CHALLENGE: THE SOCIAL MEDIA CRAZE THAT’S BURNING CHILDREN’S SKIN

November 02, 2018 1 Comment

DEODORANT CHALLENGE: THE SOCIAL MEDIA CRAZE THAT’S BURNING CHILDREN’S SKIN

A worried mum has spoken out about a dangerous new craze spreading through schools that’s leaving children’s skin covered in burns.

Appearing on ITV’s This Morning with her mum Sara Stanley, schoolgirl Kaitlyn Stanley revealed how she had burned her own arm repeatedly using an aerosol deodorant because “it looks really cool.”

Dubbed the ‘deodorant challenge’ kids across the country are reportedly filming themselves pressing the spray close to the skin and holding it there for as long as possible.

He then asked if she was worried that this could potentially damage her skin for life, to which she nodded.

Kaitlyn added that she had “no idea” how many times she had sprayed the aerosol and “didn’t know” how she felt about the way her arm looked now. 

“My friends started doing it. You spray it and then it goes white and it looks really cool so I tried it,” the 12-year-old explained.

When asked by presenter Rylan Clarke-Neil if she realised that she was damaging her skin, Kaitlyn replied “no.”

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1 Response

Jayne Loy
Jayne Loy

February 22, 2019

Just found out about your product today. I have met you once at Lost Bridge Community Church and your husband in AR. I’m excited to try your deodorant. Do you make any other products?

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